Neighborhood Guide: Waikīkī

7-Eleven Neighborhood Guide

Waikīkī

Jasmine Lombardi | Jul 20, 2017

Waikīkī

From Sunrise to Sunset

Waikīkī, the neighborhood with 2.5 miles of beachfront on O’ahu’s south shore, is one of the most famous destinations in the world. By day, thousands of beach-goers, surfers, shoppers and vacationers line the streets. By night, glittering high-rises and resort hotels light up the island’s skyline. The stretch of white sand beach is a popular hot spot for both tourists and residents, boasting long, rolling wave breaks from sunrise to sunset.

Iconic Hawaiʻi

During the 1800s, the area was a vacation retreat from the rest of the city, where Hawaiian royalty could enjoy surfing. By 1901, Waikīkī’s tourism business had expanded along with the opening of the first luxury-trade hotel, the Moana Surfrider. While much has changed since then, remnants of Waikīkī’s iconic history can still be spotted. On Kuhio Beach, a statue of the legendary Hawaiian waterman, the “Godfather of Surfing” Duke Kahanamoku, stands with his arms wide open to a new generation of wave riders. Many honor him by placing leis on his statue.

By day, thousands of beach-goers, surfers, shoppers and vacationers line the streets. By night, glittering high-rises and resort hotels light up the island’s skyline.

Shopper’s Paradise

Kalākaua Avenue, the neighborhood’s main road, is home to a number of luxury fashion houses, trendy boutiques, award-winning hotels and a diverse mix of culinary offerings. Several shopping malls line the strip, from Waikiki Shopping Plaza to Royal Hawaiian Shopping Center, to the recently remodeled International Market Place. The other main thoroughfare, Kuhio Avenue, is where you’ll find smaller, family-owned stores, cafes and grocers, as well as numerous restaurants and nightclubs. The best part is that everything is within a 1.5 square-mile radius and just a few blocks to the ocean.

Playground Of The Pacific

For a more relaxed day, you can get the family together for a pot luck at the sprawling 500-acre Kapi'olani Park. You can also take the keiki and young-at-heart to the Waikīkī Aquarium or Honolulu Zoo, or enjoy the Diamond Head view while strolling along the Ala Wai canal. Other interesting places to wander include the Ala Wai Harbor, Fort DeRussy Beach Park and Kahanamoku Lagoon.

Waikīkī’s lively atmosphere has something to offer everyone. Dubbed “The Playground of the Pacific,” today’s Waikīkī provides endless opportunities to explore and enjoy all that south shore has to offer.